i write from the standpoint as a black woman, southsider, kinkster, academic, and whatever else YOU construct me as...so i hold no barriers.

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Tenderheaded: A Comb-Bending Collection of Hair Stories [Kindle Edition]
Juliette Harris (Editor), Pamela Johnson (Editor), Ntozake Shange (Introduction)
Book Description
Publication Date: August 23, 2001


What could make a smart woman ignore doctor’s orders? What could get a hardworking employee fired from her job? What could get a black woman in hot water with her white boyfriend? In a word… HAIR. When does a few ounces feel like a few tons? When a doctor advises a black woman to start an exercise program and she wonders how she can do it without breaking a sweat. When an employer fires her for wearing a cultural hairstyle that’s “unprofessional,” and she has to go to court to plead for her job. When she’s with her man, and the moment she’s supposed to let loose, she stops to secure her head scarf so he doesn’t disturb the ‘do. TENDERHEADED? Yes, definitely. All black women are, in one way or another. The issue is not only about looking good, but about feeling adequate in a society where the beauty standards are unobtainable for most women.Tenderheaded boldly throws open the closet where black women’s skeletons have been threatening to burst down the door. In poems, essays, cartoons, photos, and excerpts from novels and plays, women and men speak to the meaning hair has for them, and for society. In an intimate letter, A’Leila Perry Bundles pays tribute to her great-grandmother, hair-care pioneer Madam C.J. Walker, who launched a generation of African-American businesswomen. Corporate consultant Cherilyn “Liv” Wright interviews men and women on the hilarious ways they handle “the hair issue” between the sheets. Art historian Henry John Drewal explores how hairstyles, in Yoruba culture, indicate spiritual destiny, and activist Angela Davis questions how her message of revolution got reduced to a hairstyle. Tenderheaded is as rich and diverse as the children of the African diaspora. With works by Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, bell hooks, Henry Louis Gates Jr., and other writers of passion, persuasion, and humor — this is sure to be one of the most talked-about books of the year.

Tenderheaded: A Comb-Bending Collection of Hair Stories [Kindle Edition]

Juliette Harris Pamela Johnson Ntozake Shange 

Book Description

 August 23, 2001
What could make a smart woman ignore doctor’s orders? 
What could get a hardworking employee fired from her job? 
What could get a black woman in hot water with her white boyfriend? 
In a word… 
HAIR. 
When does a few ounces feel like a few tons? When a doctor advises a black woman to start an exercise program and she wonders how she can do it without breaking a sweat. When an employer fires her for wearing a cultural hairstyle that’s “unprofessional,” and she has to go to court to plead for her job. When she’s with her man, and the moment she’s supposed to let loose, she stops to secure her head scarf so he doesn’t disturb the ‘do. 
TENDERHEADED? 
Yes, definitely. All black women are, in one way or another. 
The issue is not only about looking good, but about feeling adequate in a society where the beauty standards are unobtainable for most women.Tenderheaded boldly throws open the closet where black women’s skeletons have been threatening to burst down the door. In poems, essays, cartoons, photos, and excerpts from novels and plays, women and men speak to the meaning hair has for them, and for society. In an intimate letter, A’Leila Perry Bundles pays tribute to her great-grandmother, hair-care pioneer Madam C.J. Walker, who launched a generation of African-American businesswomen. Corporate consultant Cherilyn “Liv” Wright interviews men and women on the hilarious ways they handle “the hair issue” between the sheets. Art historian Henry John Drewal explores how hairstyles, in Yoruba culture, indicate spiritual destiny, and activist Angela Davis questions how her message of revolution got reduced to a hairstyle. 
Tenderheaded is as rich and diverse as the children of the African diaspora. With works by Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, bell hooks, Henry Louis Gates Jr., and other writers of passion, persuasion, and humor — this is sure to be one of the most talked-about books of the year.

(via dynastylnoire)

curvellas:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

dynastylnoire:

virtuouslyvindicated:

baronessvondengler:

blipsterinsverige:

acceber74:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

"Would you let Dr. Oz do your big chop?? Dr. Oz promoted going all natural when it comes to your hair and encouraged his viewers to learn to love their natural hair. Dr. Oz Talks About How To Maintain Natural Nappy Hair Via Recapo reports: He showed that to go natural when it comes to your hair means to embrace your natural texture, say goodbye to relaxers and chemicals, and be comfortable in your own skin.”

I was hoping this was fake but its not! This a real episode of the Dr Oz show and his teaching black women how to “maintain natural nappy hair”  He invited a natural hairstylist  help him a bit but I am not here for AT ALL!

1. He is a cardiac surgeon what does he know about hair? What does he know about black hair that makes him qualify to teach us how to maintain it? Does he have a child with our hair texture? Does his wife have our hair texture?

2. He is a freaking man. A white man to be exact and you can take this however you like. 

3. Is this black lady serious? If you black I’m sure you know plenty of black women, black hairstylist who can teach you about these stuff, but you went to a dr? Not some sort of hair doctor but a cardiac surgeon.  I thought when people needed advice on hair stuff I thought you go to a stylist or somebody who knows these stuff and actually do it for a living.

 I don’t man what you guys think about this?

I think Dr. Oz should focus on what he knows. 

I dunno who Dr Oz is and he may be great with hearts and lungs, but after a quick google search and going by his eyebrows alone I wouldn’t trust him with my hair. I don’t get his angle - what’s his business with this? I just hope that fool that is smiling with fear in that pic is getting paid cos after her 1 minute of fame is up she’s gonna need a wig or summat to disguise the fact that she was the one that Dr Oz ‘helped’. I’m lol’ing - I can’t

Not here for it. I’m always suspicious when white people / men come with all this “accept yourself and go natural” bs. As if anyone chooses not to be themselves and it’s not society that forces them to conform in the first place.

THE BOLD HAS ME FLAT LINED. CPR PLEASE.

ROFLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

he’s actually taken time away from telling people to lose weight to do something else?

i disagree with y’all on this one. i mean true dr. oz probably knows fuckall about natural hair but it’s nice to see our hair type getting traction in mass media. even if it’s for educational purposes. at the end of the day maybe it’s some white people watching that show that might ask a few less ignorant ass annoying questions to their black coworker with natural hair and understand more about our struggle and expression. not to mention we do need to see natural hair getting exposure and being normalized so our hair type can stop being seen as “distracting” and “unprofessional”. 

note-a-bear:

fuckyeahpoussey:

underwitch:

YESSSSSS

HOLY SHIT!

Get it get it

note-a-bear:

fuckyeahpoussey:

underwitch:

YESSSSSS

HOLY SHIT!

Get it get it

(Source: ppontmercyy, via curvellas)

#Equality inc. gets it wrong again

youreallythoughtwascoolhuh:

 image

Gabourey is actually making a critique of this violence through the use of her joke- regardless if she agrees with the statement or not, she discusses how they specifically target trans people. there is nothing anti-trans about that, since to most people this would be an afterthought and not included as part of a scripted commentary on national television. now, lets talk about something nobody wants to discuss/acknowledge, race, anti-black commentary- which is imbedded into everything.

queennubian:

godswerepoetsonce:

blackgrlmeat:

illbegotdamn:

hecallsmespring:

chevfuckinchelios:

chunkysmoker420:

saltthought:

Don’t play

I have 2 jars of blue magic. That shit will last a lifetime 

Still have some Murray’s from the 12th grade

they got my whole childhood up there

i think i threw away some old ass wave and groom last year & i’ll be money that my mom AND sister have most of these under their sinks right now.

that ultra sheen, murray’s, & super gro though…lol damn

Dax has always been a staple in my household. I have about 4 different Dax products now. lol We had Supre Gro, Nu Nile, and Ultra Sheen too. 

My childhood in hair products.

so many smells happening at the same time

(Source: maminature, via youfunkybitchyou)

thesoftghetto:

seriouslyamerica:

If you don’t think Jessica Williams is the best part of The Daily Show, you’re wrong.

~*click here for more soft ghetto*~

She funny

(Source: lavernecox)

(Source: sirenssongs, via curvellas)

(Source: darkskinwomen, via getkinky)